Graston Technique

Therapists at Good Shepherd are using stainless steel instruments to help patients recover from injury and find relief from pain. These tools are a key component of the Graston Technique.

Therapists at Good Shepherd are using uniquely designed stainless steel instruments to help patients recover from injury and find relief from pain. With the instruments, therapists can deliver targeted soft tissue mobilization, or massage, at the deepest level.

The instruments are a key component of the Graston Technique®, says Cynthia Bauer, director of Outpatient Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, and part of the therapy team specially trained in the technique.

“Deep instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization breaks up damaged tissue and helps it heal in the correct way,” says Bauer. “The instruments contour to the body’s shape and allow the therapist to focus treatment. The therapist controls the pressure.”

The Graston Technique is part of an overall treatment plan personalized for each patient, Bauer adds. During the initial evaluation, therapists assess whether the technique will benefit the patient.

Many conditions that affect the muscles and tendons can be treated with the Graston Technique. The most common areas Bauer treats are the heel, foot, shoulder, hip, neck and upper back. Patients with tightness around the kneecap following knee replacement surgery also have found relief.

“The Graston Technique has even helped patients with chronic conditions when traditional therapies did not work,” Bauer says. “Why live with pain and limitations if you don’t have to?”

For more information about the Graston Technique, call 1-888-44-REHAB (73422) or contact us.